The Danger of Political Parties: We Were Warned

Why don’t we just stop yelling at each other?

A few days ago, during a socratic seminar in my Time to Think class, my teacher interrupted our discussion to congratulate the class on our ability to debate like rational human beings. In a time when the country seems split down the middle and with politics as polarized as ever, it seems that we have forgotten the key to having an effective argument: acknowledging validity of the other person’s ideas.

Humans have this really cool ability to communicate with each other through the advanced language system that we’ve been building and editing since the first person ever pointed at something and gave it a name. These days, however, we have all mastered our mother language, but for some reason, we’ve lost the ability to really communicate. Sure, we can tell each other our ideas and argue till the cows come home, but are we really gaining anything from our conversations? Think about the last time you turned on your TV to watch CNN. You most likely read a caption on the bottom that said “BREAKING NEWS: New Allegations Against President” then watched a reporter try to interview a few experts before eventually bringing the issue to a panel discussion. If you’re anything like me, this process has probably brought you more anxiety and frustration than a working sense of the day’s news, which, by the way, is not the way cable news is supposed to work.

An interviewer asks a question and gets no response or is interrupted, a panel of experts talk over each other for ten minutes straight, there’s a split screen between a daily White House Press Briefing and a running commentary by a senator from the opposite side of the aisle; all of these scenarios are more confusing than educational and convince me that the only source of news I need is Last Week Tonight with John Oliver. But here’s the problem:

I identify as a liberal, someone who typically favors candidates from the Democratic Party and believes in a welfare state, so I tend to find get my daily news through more liberal-leaning sources of media; The New York Times, CNN, PBS, and the occasional satirical late night television host. I hear the words Republican or conservative and I’m immediately prepared to disagree with the source and brace myself for an argument. But here’s the thing, that’s really bad.

Labels cause a lot of trouble and the moment someone or something identifies as either liberal or conservative, most audience members have already decided whether or not they’re going to agree or disagree with the source. I’ll admit it, I’m guilty of this. Political parties are so polarized in today’s day and age that nobody even dares to be a moderate. Unfortunately, parties are typically simplified down to a few controversial policy points and whoever happens to be the party’s most popular, recognizable member becomes that group’s symbol. This is not the way things should be done. Once we generalize politics down to two angry groups arguing all day long and refusing to compromise with each other, we enter a dangerous political climate that can only hurt our country in the long run.

We have this notion that if a Democrat wants to introduce some form of policy or nominate someone to the Supreme Court, all the Republicans will vote against their decision and vice versa. These days, a Republican President has very little sway over legislation if he/she doesn’t come with a matching House and Senate. Politicians are so stuck in their party’s lines that they forget to collaborate and consider issues from all points of view. Just because a social reform comes from a Republican doesn’t mean it’s going to cut some program’s budget or discriminate against a group of people, that’s not what the party stands for, but most Democrats will dismiss the Republican suggestion immediately. If they’re looking through the proposed plan, they often search for that which confirms their pre-existing expectations. I would argue that it’s this confirmation bias that makes our government seem so useless.

George Washington, our country’s arguably most widely accepted and appreciated president, warned us all about the danger of political parties all the way back in 1796. To this day, his words drip with premonition and leave me wondering if he was truly capable of seeing where our politics would wind up a two centuries later. In the words of our first president:

It serves always to distract the public councils and enfeeble the public administration. It agitates the community with ill-founded jealousies and false alarms, kindles the animosity of one part against another, foments occasionally riot and insurrection. It opens the door to foreign influence and corruption, which finds a facilitated access to the government itself through the channels of party passions… the common and continual mischiefs of the spirit of party are sufficient to make it the interest and duty of a wise people to discourage and restrain it (Washington, 1796).

A Love Letter to Getting Mail

What Time Does the Mail Truck Come?

There’s something quite romantic about receiving a handwritten letter. I always love to see a letter waiting on the counter with my name written on it, although recently it’s almost certainly an advertisement for a certain college. But sometimes it’s not. It could be a ‘thank you’ or a birthday card, or hopefully it’s a love letter from Harry Styles. No matter who wrote it or how much they wrote, opening a letter is always lovely. I don’t know why it’s the best feeling, but I have some assumptions…

  1. Someone spent time actually sitting down to handwrite a note just for you
  2. Typically the reason people write instead of text nowadays is because the contents of the letter aren’t urgent, so getting mail means something good or exciting has happened
  3. You can keep the letter forever and never accidentally delete it (unless you throw them out)
  4. The person who wrote it probably loves you a lot
  5. It’s a pleasant surprise
  6. Letters are a simple, but thoughtful gift
  7. They feel more professional and more heartfelt
  8. Opening envelopes is extremely stress relieving and gratifying

I assume my letter loving addiction was founded soon after I first attended camp in Maine. Homesick and friendless, I waited for mail time each day hoping that my mom replied to my tear stained letter. It was the only way we could communicate so letters were often lengthy and took my mind off missing home. One year when my best friend wasn’t returning to camp with me, my sister packed 21 letters (one for each day of camp) into my trunk so I could open one each day. A thoughtful gesture that helped me feel a little less lonely and inspired me to not waste my time at camp.

Writing and receiving letters has got to be something that I most love.

Top 5 Travel Bag Items

Clean, Organized, Satisfied, Fragrant, and Energized

Tomorrow, I leave for a week-long trip to Europe with my school. I packed last night, hugged my dad goodbye about 15 minutes ago, (he’s golfing in the morning and I plan on waking up at 11:00) and looked up the Dutch translations for, “Hi, do you speak English?” and “Yes, I’m American”. So basically, I’m prepped and ready to go.

At this point, I consider myself more or less accustomed to the whole packing process, having managed to fit enough stuff into a suitcase to last me anywhere from a three-day weekend in New York to a six month stint in Northern France. I thought that my last blog post before leaving on yet another trip should be a walkthrough of the bag that I take with me wherever I go.

The Top Five Things You Need in Your Travel Bag

  1. Hand Sanitizer

Let’s face it, travel is dirty. Your hands touch all sorts of screens, doors, and railings that are covered with germs and you can never be sure when you’ll be able to find a sink. I recommend Bath and Body Works “PocketBac Sanitizers” (warm vanilla sugar being a must).

  1. A Notebook

If you’re anything like me, then the key to keeping track of your thoughts is a good, old-fashioned notebook. Whenever an idea pops into my head, I see something a little funky, or learn a new vocabulary word, I always write it down. Not only is this super useful when looking back on your trips, but also is a great way to keep organized throughout your journeys around the globe.

HINT: If you’re traveling to a country where they speak a different language, have a page dedicated to “Need-to-Know” phrases: greetings, ways to ask for directions, how convey personal information like your country of origin, allergies, etc.

  1. A Snack

It seems obvious, but a lot of people forget to keep a protein bar or bag on nuts on hand. Between busses, trains, and cabs, transportation can take up a lot of your time, making it easy to miss out on meals. A snack a day keeps the headaches away. Candy DOES NOT count!

  1. Antiperspirant

We all sweat; we all smell. The sooner we accept it and fix it, the happier all our noses will be.

  1. Starbucks VIA Instant Coffee

Sure, we’d all love to think that we’ll be popping in for a café au lait et croissant every time we need a pick-me-up around mid-day. Whether you sleep in late and miss your early morning morning Cup o’ Joe or find yourself getting droopy eyed at three, on the go caffeine can go a long way.

HINT: Want to avoid not so tasty airplane coffee? Take your favorite instant brand and ask for hot water on the plane. They always have it, and you save yourself from choking down mud. You’re welcome.